Last week the web was on fire over the news that a real estate development company was suing a woman over what she said on her Twitter page about mold in her apartment, in a building that the company owned. This woman only had 20 followers and the company has openly admitted that they are a “sue first, ask questions later” type of organization. But because of their outrageous lawsuit, instead of 20 or so people really reading the woman’s comment, now thousands of people have read about it.

Even though the lawsuit is outrageous in and of itself, it’s important to remember the real impact of this company’s organization. Their attempt to prevent libel against the way they manage their property has now backfired. Instead of publicly aiding the woman (possibly responding to her over Twitter), they have now alienated even more perspective customers by presenting a tough, unwavering, aggressive attitude that won’t make anyone want to live on their properties.

In the era of social media, organizations need to be careful how they respond to criticism and bad press. Many times, how they handle a situation has a lot worse impact than the effects of libel.

For more information, click here to read about it in the Chicago Tribune.

Kelsey Jones

Kelsey Jones

Founder/Chief Marketing Consultant at Six Stories
Kelsey Jones helps clients around the world grow their social media, content, and search marketing presence. She enjoys writing and consuming all kinds of content, both in digital and tattered paperback form.
Kelsey Jones
Kelsey Jones
Kelsey Jones

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